DMOZ Blog – A little late?

I saw that DMOZ launched their blog yesterday (9/26/07). I actually had to snicker to myself. Now they launch a blog? What about 2 or 3 years ago when it would have been helpful. So many people, SEO people, have been put off by the lack of response from DMOZ that I’m not sure they can ever recover. If not for the “support” of Google I’m sure this directory would have been finished long ago. I found it particularly humorous they have a comments turned on. We’ll see if they actually accept any. I’m sure most of the comments will be of the unhelpful nature. Although I am purely speculating because at this time there were two comments and one of them was mine: “Welcome to the blogsphere. I hope this will be the first steps in mending the relationship between DMOZ and the Internet public.”. (9/25/07). I did click the FAQ for the blog and it directed me to the DMOZ.org FAQ page, so there wasn’t much to learn from that. DMOZ does explain the purpose of the blog: We intend to use this blog to: Provide authentic messages about DMOZ and the efforts of our volunteer community. Highlight enhancements, both current and future. Allow editors to showcase their categories and describe, in their own words, why DMOZ is so important. Recruit new editors. If you have access to the Web and are passionate about a category, find out how to apply. Additionally we want to hear from you. I’ll hold my judgment based on the number of posts as well as the number of comments, both critical...

Google Interview Questions

I have been creating interview questions and researching what other companies ask their potential employees. In doing so I came across these sample interview questions asked by Google. After reading them I know I don’t want to work for Google and probably couldn’t get passed the first round, for that matter. Here are some of the quirkier, less technical questions, for your amusement. You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and your mass is proportionally reduced so as to maintain your original density. You are then thrown into an empty glass blender. The blades will start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?” Explain a database in three sentences to your eight-year-old nephew. How many gas stations would you say there are in the United States? You have a sheet cake. There is a rectangular piece missing from the inside of the sheet cake. The location of the missing piece is arbitrary. I was told I could assume I had the means to make the cuts. How do you divide the sheet cake into 2 even proportions with 2 cuts? It’s 2PM on a sunny Sunday afternoon in the Bay Area. You’re minutes from the Pacific Ocean, redwood forest hiking trails and world class cultural attractions. What do you do? What will be the next great improvement in search technology? Why are manhole covers round? A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened? Explain the significance of “dead beef”. You are at a party with a friend and 10 people are present including you and the friend. Your friend makes...

When to Use a 301 vs. 302 Redirect

There are two types of redirects you can use, a 301 and a 302. These numbers refer to the HTTP Status Code returned by the server for a given URL. A 301 redirect tells the search engine that the page has moved permanently to the new URL. A 302 redirect tells the search engine that the move is only temporary, and you may decide to show content at the original location in the future without a redirect. 301 Redirects All three major search engines handle 301 redirects the same, that is to say they ignore the original URL and instead index the destination URL. 301 redirects can be very powerful when you redesign your site and the URLs change, move to a different domain, acquire a new domain, or implement a URL rewrite. In most cases, this is the type of redirect you want to use because you know exactly how the search engines will respond. 302 Redirects The three major engines handle 302 redirects very differently, and because of this 302s are typically not recommended. Google treats 302 redirects differently depending if they are on-domain or off-domain. An example of an on-domain redirect is athletics.mlb.com which uses a 302 redirect to http://oakland.athletics.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=oak. If you search for “oakland a’s” in Google you will see that athletics.mlb.com is displayed in the results because links point to that URL, which in turn uses a 302 redirect to the destination page. This is a great example where 302 redirects can be used effectively, since the shorter URL looks much more enticing in the results pages. Off-domain 302 redirects would be ripe for...