The Real Time Web Is For Everybody

Many internet users believe that the real time web isn’t available to them. If you don’t update on Twitter, post pictures on Facebook, network on LinedIn – people think that they aren’t able to learn and benefit from the real time web. This is not the case – and tons of startups and new websites have launched which require no login, membership, or passwords to access. Below, are examples of how to benefit from these services, right now: Anyone can search the real time web. You can visit Twitter and instantly perform a search to see what people are saying about a specific page. To learn more about the types of searches that the real time web works best with, this search tips page offers several categories for which to search from. All in all, the best part about a real time search is that its instant. Plus, each day it changes, so a search today will offer different comments and thoughts than a search for the same keyword 3 weeks from now. If you want to see the hottest trends, head over to What The Trend which will summarize each of the hot topics on the web right now. In a format that can be compared to WikiPedia – the site allows any user to provide feedback as to why a particular topic is trending right now. Every day, something new is a hot trend on the real time web, and anyway can track them at What The Trend or a variety of other sources. When people share links on the real time web, it is often about...

Meet Amy Vernon: the First Top 25 Female Digg User

Pick a social media site, any social media site.  Amy Vernon probably has a presence on it, and a prominent one.  She’s a top 25 all-time Digg submitter, a “Super-Mixxer” on Mixx, a power tweeter on Twitter and a highly influential Stumbler on Stumbleupon. She also maintains several blogs, including TVTyrant.com. Somehow, she still finds time to write for a slew of others, like Burbia.com, and HotHardware.com.  Not impressed yet? Consider that she’s also a full-time mom with two kids. But there’s more to the Vernon story.  In 2008, she became the highest ranked female Digg user ever and today stands at number 19 according to SocialBlade.  Recently, I caught up with Amy so I could learn about her rise to social media “maven-hood.”  We also chatted about the one topic that no discussion with a top 25 digger would be complete without: the precise direction of social media (skip to the last question if you can’t wait). Since Digg supposedly caters to a mostly male demographic, many are surprised to learn that a female has broken into the top 25.  Do you think the type of content that becomes popular on Digg these days is slowly changing to cut across more demographics than it has in the past, or do you think the kind of stories that become popular are pretty much the same as they were, say, three years ago? I think the key word there is “supposedly.”  Things that are popular on Digg tend toward stuff guys (particularly geek guys) like, I guess – computers, gadgets, science fiction, Megan Fox, boobies – but for the most...