Latent semantic search: its effect on SEO and page ranking

The SEO industry has seen a four-fold increase in the past three years with all the business web sites and blogs tirelessly working to increase their content’s visibility in the internet searches. This competition resulted in the origin of several SEO techniques for increasing the web site rankings given by the search engines. These techniques mainly concentrate on the usage of keywords that the users will most likely look for and it resulted in some SEOs filling the content cleverly with those keywords for their own gains. The end result of this process is that several worthy web pages lacked visibility. To counteract this, the search engines came up with a new concept in their search algorithms which is called Linear Semantic Search (more commonly known as Linear Semantic Indexing or LSI). It targets not only on the specific keywords that are being searched for, but also on their semantic relationship with the other contents of the page and other common words that are related to them. The prominent characteristic of this method is its capacity to dig out the conceptual content of a web page through forming associations among the terms occurring in related contexts. For example, if you search for the word ‘ppi claims’, you will get different results like ‘Reclaim PPI’, ‘Mis-sold PPI’ and ‘ppi claims – no win, no fee’ all of which are related to the keyword. It fueled the organic search by searching for relevance instead of the traditional way of looking for the keywords that match with the text which is being searched for. This method also put a check on the...

What Makes a Good SEO Client

What Makes a Good SEO Client? This is the flip side of the question many clients have to answer, “What makes a good SEO company to do business with?”, however; successful implementation of any SEO strategy is based on a partnership between SEO Company and client.  Not only do you need a good SEO consultant but also a good SEO client, so what qualities should you see in such a good SEO client? Trust in the SEO Company and their SEO Advice Clients who have embarked on an ecommerce strategy have already recognized the potential of the web for their business.  There is much that is different from the real world, however some basic precepts are the same no matter who you are or what you are doing.  Trust is one of them, and after selecting an SEO partner the client must be able to trust what the SEO practitioner is advising and helping the client to implement for their web strategy. Availability and Responsiveness A good SEO client is responsive to requests and performs their part in maintaining good lines of open communication, not only between the principal or senior management, but also the webmaster or whoever is responsible for implementing content and coding changes on the website. Being available by email or telephone is symptomatic of a good partnership, which is essential when changes need to be made quickly to react to the web developments and search engine algorithm changes. Questioning and Understanding A good SEO client values the experience and expertise a good SEO practitioner brings to the business mix, however it is important the client...

Seo Predictions for 2010

SEO Predictions for 2010 Another year of search engine madness is about to come to a close. In 2009 we have seen the Google search engine display many variances and ranking fluctuations. So before we put on the swami cap and bring out Nostradamus SEO quatrains into the light, let’s recap some of the major Google changes and initiatives. In 2009 The Google Search Engine: Put more weight toward the keywords in the domain. In fact, keyword-rich domains could achieve top 10 rankings in less competitive phrases just on the weight of the domain name and a few onsite optimization tweaks. We saw Google increase the visible space for the Adwords Sponsored PPC displays. The money maker for Google is encroaching more and more on the organic search results territory. We saw name branded companies get extra weight in the organic results, not from normal SEO algorithm enhancements and features, but from manual Google manipulation. Searchers’ IP addresses were instrumental in displaying Google Local results for major keyword terms in various 1 box or 4 box positions in the organic search results. Customized Search and IP captured-related searches made search results for the unknown more focused on what you have visited in the past rather then the “true” organic listings. The introduction of Caffeine by Google displayed more real time results from news, Twitter, Facebook and other sources and was displayed in various locations on the organic search results page. There were many other factors that changed in 2009, but the ones above are the most prevalent (in our eyes) and affect the potential customer click through rate. Now...

Google’s Estimating Algorithm

As always you have to take anything from Google with a grain of salt, espeically since most of their ranking algorithms are closely guarded secrets. However you really have to wonder when their estimating algorithm has trouble counting to 17 as illustrated below with screenshot snippets from the first two pages of results I witnessed...

Using Logic to Prove that Directory Links are NOT Worthless

It’s faddish these days to walk around saying, “Directory links are worthless,” or “Directory links aren’t that effective for SEO anymore.”  I don’t know where the people who seeded this myth (or the parrots who repeat it in lockstep) came from, but I know how to make them flip their opinion straight away.  By using logic. Recently a colleague of mine was looking at a client’s backlinks in Google webmaster tools and noticed that about 20 of them were coming from a single directory submission to directory name removed to preserve its effectiveness*.  I had included about 20 tags when I did the directory submission, and Google had indexed and cached each page that was created in the directory via tagging.  The fact that Google spiders this directory often and felt it was important enough to show as 20 backlinks to a site in webmaster tools would indicate to a rational person that Google trusts this directory a great deal. Yet there are still people who like to make the generalization that directory link building is dead. Why?  Well, the generalization seemed to begin after it became clear that Google was on a crusade to torture directories that sold links.  When Google feels like it, it will go to a random directory that sells links, knock down its PageRank, decache half its pages, and make sure it doesn’t rank for its own name. The fact that the only way Google can handicap the power of a directory is to manually punish it should indicate to a logical person that directory links must carry weight in the algorithm.  And based...